Checklist for a Professional House Cleaning Schedule

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A professional house cleaning schedule is key for janitorial services because it keeps your time organized and makes sure your team doesn’t miss a thing on each house cleaning job. And house cleaning is time consuming, so you’ll want to keep to a schedule. How does this work?

You need to time your house cleaning checklist to a detailed schedule. To do this, track how long each chore takes your team members for each job, and average it out. That’s how long each house cleaning chore should take. Now fit each chore for a typical house cleaning job into a schedule, so you know how much your teams are earning per job and how hard they’re working per hour.

What To Time for your House Cleaning Schedule

Here are the chores to include in your house cleaning schedule:

  • dusting
  • vacuuming
  • time to clean one full bathroom (sink, tub, toilet, mirrors, floors)
  • kitchen clutter/dishes cleanup, surface wipe down, appliance light cleaning
  • decluttering main areas
  • mopping out the floors on the way out

If your team does extra chores paid by the hour, time the most common requests as well. These sometimes include:

  • cleaning up a bedroom, making the bed
  • putting away laundry
  • fluffing pillows and straightening furniture
  • cleaning up clutter in closets

Things To Remember When Creating a Schedule

Sometimes, house cleaning can cross the bridge into handyman work or professional home organizing. You might want to keep extra heavy housecleaning or other chores that aren’t standard house cleaning in a separate service, but still time how long each chore takes. For example, cleaning windows often does not fall under the category of normal house cleaning because there are special service professionals for window cleaning. If you often get requests for extra chores, have these on your schedule under a special job section for when this scheduling issue arises so you know how to budget and bid out the job and put your team on a reasonable schedule.

House cleaning teams often work in teams of one or two, so make sure you communicate with your clients about how many cleaners to expect, and how long the team will be at their home. You’ll want to budget out each team’s time in your schedule as well, to make sure everyone is being paid a fair wage and the business is charging enough to send two cleaners to a home instead of one.

How To Create Your Team House Cleaning Schedule

Once you know how long each job will take, how many team members to send, and how much you will charge per hour or per job, you are ready to set up your team house cleaning schedule. You can use Yottled to create team availability schedules to use to keep track of your teams. Set up each team’s schedule with available hours, and then you can schedule your teams automatically by seeing when they’re available.

Don’t forget to check in with your team members occasionally to make sure you don’t need to update how long each job or chore is taking. Sometimes things change, and you’ll want to keep up to date so your teams can stay on schedule. Happy house cleaning! Made easier by Yottled.

Laura Cowan

Laura K. Cowan is a tech editor and journalist whose work has focused on promoting sustainability initiatives for automotive, green tech and conscious living media outlets. A deep study of narrative journalism, storytelling and sustainable technology allows Ms. Cowan to draw out the meaningful stories of best practices from diverse professionals in an exploration of the culture and trends in emerging industries. She is currently Co-Founder and Executive Editor of Midwest tech news blog, Cronicle Press. Ms. Cowan’s writing and speaking have appeared with Automobile Quarterly, Writer Unboxed, Inhabitat, CNBC, The Ann Arbor Observer and The National Society of Newspaper Columnists.


Laura Cowan

Laura Cowan

Laura K. Cowan is a tech editor and journalist whose work has focused on promoting sustainability initiatives for automotive, green tech and conscious living media outlets. A deep study of narrative journalism, storytelling and sustainable technology allows Ms. Cowan to draw out the meaningful stories of best practices from diverse professionals in an exploration of the culture and trends in emerging industries. She is currently Co-Founder and Executive Editor of Midwest tech news blog, Cronicle Press. Ms. Cowan’s writing and speaking have appeared with Automobile Quarterly, Writer Unboxed, Inhabitat, CNBC, The Ann Arbor Observer and The National Society of Newspaper Columnists.

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